Tag: radiography

Radiography of the Sella Turcica

By: CE4RT

Location of the sella turcica in the skull
Sella Turcica Location in the Skull

The sella turcica (also called the hypophyseal fossa or pituitary fossa) is a midline saddle-shaped depression in the sphenoid bone that is lined by the dura mater. Although it is a relatively small area, it is an extremely valuable piece of real estate in the brain because it forms the bony seat for the pituitary gland which it houses and partially encloses. One of the main reasons for imaging the sella turcica is that it is a window to the pituitary, a pea-sized gland that is often called the master endocrine gland because of the major role it plays in regulating vital body functions. Sellar components are easily demonstrated by several radiographic planes and angles. Radiology techs need to be aware of the anatomy of this region as well as correct radiographic angles and patient positioning techniques to demonstrate the sella turcica and surrounding structures accurately.

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Nuclear Medicine CQR and Structured Education

Female X-ray technician

By: CE4RT


To ensure quality healthcare, the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) has implemented a system of periodic evaluation consisting of Structured Education and Continuing Qualification Requirements (CQR). Radiologic Technologists certified before January 1, 2011, are not affected by these new requirements. Technologists who were certificate on or after 1/1/2011 receive a time-limited 10-year license. Once the 10 years are up, certification can be renewed for another 10 years by completing the CQR process. In addition, compliance with the ARRT rules and regulations includes an annual renewal process and biennial continuing education requirements. R.T.s in Nuclear Medicine require specific CE credits related to their certification. The ARRT calls this structured education.

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Radiography and Pregnancy

pregnant radiation

By: CE4RT

All radiographers learn in school why radiation is dangerous to a pregnant patient’s fetus, and that it’s very important to screen for pregnant patients allowing the physician to be informed that there is a risk.
Likewise, if you are working as a radiologic technologist, and you get pregnant, it is normal to have some concern about the harmful effects of radiation reaching your baby. Do X-ray techs need pregnancy precautions? Even though the evidence overwhelmingly suggests that a radiographer can continue to safely perform their job without risk to the fetus as long as policies and guidelines are followed, every radiographer should review what the potential effects are.

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