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ARRT* CE and Structured Education / CQR

By: CE4RT

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The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT*) has implemented a system of Structured Education and Continuing Qualification Requirements (CQR). If you were certified as a Radiologic Technologist before January 1, 2011, the new requirements will not apply to you. However, technologists who first earned their certificate on or after this date have a license that is time-limited to 10 years. Renewing certification for an additional 10 years requires completion of the CQR process. Also, moving forward as of now, R.T.’s who pursue additional credentials using the ARRT's* postprimary pathwaywill need CE credits based on specific subjects. This is known as structured education.

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Principles in Medical Ethics

By: CE4RT

Radiologic technologists are healthcare providers and are therefore obliged to follow certain values and principles. Values such as these do not give answers as to how to handle a particular situation, but provide a useful framework for understanding conflicts. Sometimes, no good solution to a dilemma in medical ethics exists, and occasionally, the values of the medical community (i.e., the hospital and its staff) conflict with the values of the individual patient, family, or larger non-medical community. These values are the basis of the ARRT code of ethics which is strictly enforced.

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Landmark Events in American Medical Ethics

By: CE4RT

Medical ethics is a system of moral principles that apply values and judgments to the practice of medicine. These principles apply to all who work in the healthcare field. Radiologic Technologists have an obligation to understand the theories, debates, and philosophies of medical ethics since it applies to their everyday life.

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Radiography and Pregnancy

By: CE4RT

All radiographers learn in school why radiation is dangerous to a pregnant patient's fetus, and that it's very important to screen for pregnant patients allowing the physician to be informed that there is a risk. 
Likewise, if you are working as a radiologic technologist, and you get pregnant. It is normal to have some concern about the harmful effects of radiation reaching your baby. Even though the evidence overwhelmingly suggests that a radiographer can continue to safely perform thier job without risk to the fetus as long as policies and guidelines are followed, every radiographer should review what the potential effects are.  

pregnant radiation

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Scheduling a Mammogram

By: Stacey Nester

Positive patient communication begins at the time the mammogram appointment is scheduled. Instilling confidence in the women is of utmost importance to acquiring the best images possible as well as ensuring women have a positive experience at your facility. The scheduling personnel should be trained in approaching the mammogram patient with care.

mamogram scheduling

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Establishing Patient Rapport During Mammograms

By: Stacey Nester

You never know what might be going on inside of a woman at the time of her mammogram. Therefore, in order to create positive patient rapport, each woman should be approached openly by the technologist with the awareness that she may have concerns that extend beyond the fact that her breasts are about to be made into pancakes. It seems that this less than modest exam brings to surface other emotional concerns that may be causing distress in a patient.
mammogram

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